Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Found a Pet ? Found the Owner? Ask for Proof of Ownership!



You’ve found a pet. You receive a call from someone, and after some discussion, you believe it’s a match. Have you heard about pet flipping? Here is how *YOU* can ensure that you return the pet to its rightful owner.

  • Ask for proof of ownership. 
  • Ask for a photo. 
  • Ask for veterinary records. 
  • Ask the owner to describe the collar/harness. 
  • Ask the owner to describe unique markings on the pet’s body. 

For Craigslist ads:

If you want to include a picture of the pet, post the picture in black or white, or post a close up of the dog’s face only.

Always, always ask for proof of ownership from the person claiming to be the owner.

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Found A Wandering Dog? Do not leave the dog unattended in the backyard.




So, you have found a wandering dog. You feel it is a lost dog, but you’re in a rush to get to your next appointment. Or, perhaps you can’t keep the pet at your home due to your personal pets who don’t welcome newcomers of the furry kind :)

Please take a moment to reconsider leaving the dog in your backyard. Even though your property may be fenced, the dog could be a jumper and escape the confined area.
Call your local animal control. They will be able to come and retrieve the dog. If you’re in a rush, check with a neighbor or friend to see if they can secure the dog on a leash until animal control arrives.

Have a local veterinarian in the area? Drop the dog off with them. Most clinics will gladly help lost animals. If they do not have the means to keep the dog overnight, they will contact animal control to pick up the dog.

Animals fare a good chance of being reunited if taken to the closest shelter to where the pet was found. The average owner will check their local shelter for their lost pet.

We must work together as a community. Savings lives IS within our reach! Help us help them!

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Disaster Preparedness For Pets During Tornado Season


Source: The Humane Society of The United States


Your FAMILY disaster plan should include the furry members too!


1. Bring pets inside!

2. Create a pet emergency supply kit that includes food & water for at least five days, medications for at least five days, medication records, microchip registration paperwork (or at bare minimum, microchip manufacturer, manufacturer phone #, and microchip ID number for each pet), cat litter and litter box, sturdy leash, harness and pet carriers/kennels/crates, Thundershirts, clear & current photo of each pet, and a list of any behavior issues that may exist. You may also want to keep paper towels and regular towels on hand.

3. Make sure each pet is wearing a collar with ID tags that are not faded. Ensure your pet's ID tags have the most current contact information listed.

4. Make sure the contact information is up to date on your pet's microchip registration! Contact the microchip company prior to impending bad weather.

5. Do not leave your pets behind if you have to evacuate. Take them with you! Remember Hurricane Katrina. If you have had to change locations for safety needs, be sure to remember:

a) Don't let your pets roam loose. They have just had to endure anxiety and change of location. Your pet's familiar scents may be no more; it will be easy for your pet to become disoriented.

b) Keep pets safe in carriers or on a leash at all times. They could be a flight risk due to anxiety.

c) Be patient with your pets after a disaster. Keep calm and give them time to adjust. Try to return to their normal schedule as soon as you can.


Set up your kennels ahead of time in your safe zone where you and your family go during tornado watches.  Try to stay calm to help your children and pets remain calm.  Keep blankets on hand to keep everyone shielded from any debris that may come.






Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Check Shelters In Person!


Due to overcrowded shelters, it is not possible for shelter workers to keep up with details of all animals in its care.

Please do not rely on verbal descriptions of pets to determine whether your lost loved one is in the shelter or animal control facility. One person may describe a dog as a lab mix. Another might refer to the same dog as a pitbull.

Lost pets do not travel by sidewalk or roads. They take shortcuts. As a result, they can end up in a neighboring community, which could have a different animal control or shelter associated with it. Check all shelters within your metropolitan community.

Be sure to check the stray hold area of shelters and animal control facilities AS WELL AS the adoption floor. 


Remember:
Not all of us are abandoned.
Not all of us are neglected.
Not all of us are abused.
Many of us are lost.
And we need YOUR help to get home.

Monday, April 6, 2015

Have You Posted a Lost or Found Pet On Craigslist?



Did you list your email address as your contact information? If so, check the email that you have associated with your ad FREQUENTLY! You may receive email responses - don’t miss the opportunity to follow - up!

Did you choose to keep your email address anonymous? No problem! Be sure to CHECK your email FREQUENTLY so you don’t miss a lead on the pet!

We have millions of animals being euthanized annually across the United States. Many of these animals may have accidentally escaped the safe environment called home. Don’t let them become a statistic if “no one responded” to your ad. After all, maybe they did respond and you forgot to check email...

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Found A Wandering Dog?




So, you have found a wandering dog. You feel it is a lost dog, but you’re in a rush to get to your next appointment. Or, perhaps you can’t keep the pet at your home due to your personal pets who don’t welcome newcomers of the furry kind :)

Please take a moment to reconsider leaving the dog in your backyard. Even though your property may be fenced, the dog could be a jumper and escape the confined area. After all, the pet is in unfamiliar territory with unfamiliar scents, sounds and people.  They can become frightened and even frantic.  Escape could be on their critical path to "safety" in their mind.

Call your local animal control. They will be able to come and retrieve the dog. If you’re in a rush, check with a neighbor or friend to see if they can secure the dog on a leash or in a crate/kennel until animal control arrives.

Have a local veterinarian in the area? Drop the dog off with them. Most clinics will gladly help lost animals. If they do not have the means to keep the dog overnight, they will contact the local animal control to pick up the dog.

Animals fare a good chance of being reunited if taken to the closest shelter to where the pet was found. The average owner will check their local shelter for their lost pet, not a shelter outside of their city limits.

We must work together as a community. Savings lives IS within our reach! Help us help them!